Counseling

Student Support has two counselors on staff to assist students in addressing problems that are hindering or could potentially hinder their academic progress. Such problems might be academic or personal in nature. All counseling services are free and confidential. To schedule an appointment to meet with a counselor, call Ms. Davia Speed-Berry at (318) 767-2604.

When should I see a counselor?

Students can meet and speak with a counselor about any problem that is or could become an obstacle to their academic success. Common problems faced by students include the following:

  • high-levels of anxiety or stress
  • feelings of low self-worth or depression
  • difficulties in relationships with family members, spouses, or friends
  • feelings of grief or loss due to the loss of a family member or close friend
  • balancing school, work, and family responsibilities
  • managing anger or other strong emotions
  • stress or trauma associated with prolonged military service or other intense experiences or activities
  • poor time management and/or study skills
  • uncertainty about academic goals or choice of degree program or major

In short, no problem is too big or too small to our counselors. They will provide you with whatever help they can or, if necessary, refer you to others who can assist you.









What is the difference between counseling and advising?

Advisors help students understand the requirements of their degree programs and identify the courses need to take each semester to meet those requirements. Advisors can also provide help and guidance to students who are experiencing difficulties in their classes. In general, counselors assist students who are having problems of a more personal nature, which may or may not be adversely affecting their academic progress. 









Will what I tell the counselor be treated with confidentiality?

Counselors are bound by a code of ethics that obligates them to treat with absolute confidentiality anything told to them by a client.  Counselors take this obligation very seriously as it is the basis of the bond trust that they must have with those who seek their help.  









Will I be charged a fee if see a counselor?

How do I make an appointment to see a counselor?

What can I do to better manage the stress that I feel when I'm taking classes?

How can I improve my time management skills?

How can I improve my study skills?

 









  • Confidentiality

    In protecting your information, we follow all professional standards and state and federal laws.

  • Making an Appointment

    To set up your first appointment, please come to our office, Student Services, Room W206 (above the bookstore) between 8:00-4:00 Monday-Friday. The secretary will set up your first appointment. You may also call our office 318.473.6545 and make your appointment by phone.

  • The First Appointment

    During this initial session you will describe your current concerns. Your counselor will make every effort to assess your situation and will probably ask questions to get specific information about your situation.

    At the end of this first appointment, you and your counselor will talk about the possible options to best meet your needs. This might include gathering additional information, scheduling a follow-up session, or identifying an off-campus referral that will best suit your needs

  • Individual Counseling

    Individual counseling provides an opportunity to talk with an objective, caring professional about your concerns. Your concerns might include feelings of low self-esteem, anxiety, depression, academic issues, work issues, or your issues in your relationships. Since every situation is different, the total number of sessions scheduled will vary. You and your counselor will determine the number of sessions needed.

  • Couples Counseling

    Short-term couples counseling can be provided for a couple when at least one member is enrolled as a student at Louisiana State University Alexandria and concerns and difficulties within the relationship are hindering the student=s academic performance.

  • Crisis Intervention

    Emergency consultation and crisis counseling is available to students in person or by telephone. If a student is dealing with an urgent situation or crisis during regular business hours, come into the Student Services office as soon as possible and request to be seen by a counselor. If you are not able to come to Counseling Services, please call us at 318.473.6545 and ask to speak to a counselor.

    We provide crisis counseling services and support when an event occurs on the national, community, or campus level that affects the well being of the members of the campus community.

 

Time Management

Time management helps you become more organized in your academic and social life. By keeping track of your time, you will have a more responsible approach toward your activities. The purpose of time management is not only to be a good student, but also to have a life! Your time management schedule should be adjusted according to your weekly or monthly work load, social activities, meetings, and exercise plans.

Creating a Weekly Time Management Schedule

  1. Print out a Time Management Weekly Schedule
  2. Fill in the following things on your weekly schedule with a ruler and pencil:
    • All classes
    • One hour for lunch and dinner
    • Jobs
    • Athletic or other practices
    • Regularly scheduled meetings (such as clubs)
    • Language or study labs
    • Meet with per tutors to study
    • Regular exercise or workouts
    • Any TV shows you always watch!
    Make photocopies of this schedule for weekly time management adjustments.
  3. Fill in study time for one week on one of your schedules, based on the class work, tests, papers and projects that you have that specific week. As you schedule study hours, remember to keep in mind that different people study different ways. Some classes will take less time to study for than others, and other classes may require more effort. Be sure to ask yourself the following questions:
    • At what time of day do I prefer to study? Morning, afternoon, or night?
    • Do I prefer to study for several hours at a time or for short chunks of time?
    • What are my easiest and most difficult courses?
    • Will I study on the weekends? (Remember that Sunday is usually a study night that can be used for planning assignments and catching up.)
    Use your answers to these questions as a guide when scheduling your study time. Also, be sure to schedule breaks after a block of two hours of studying. This will help you to be refreshed and refocused!
  4. Try your schedule for a week. When you schedule your study time for the next week, ask yourself what you liked and didn't like about the previous week's schedule, and change things accordingly. This will help you to create a schedule that is best suited to your habits and needs.

College Transition

Here are a few quick and simple things you can do to enhance the quality of this time and experience called college.

Be sure to stick with the basics. These include eating a balanced diet, at least most of the time. You know what the basic food groups are and how you should eat, and it is up to you to take responsibility to do that. Take the time to eat some of the good food that you need to keep yourself at an excellent level of health.

Research indicates that the average college student needs seven to eight hours of sleep to perform at their optimum. It is important to try to get to bed at about the same time and get up at the same time on school nights. Students often make the mistake of trying to set and reset their biological clocks by the first class they have. Even on weekends it is important not to stretch your time schedule too much. Many feelings of fatigue are really a function of irregular sleep patterns. Short naps in the afternoon or early evening can enhance your performance but they cannot take the place of regular sleep. If you work and you are a full-time student, try to limit your job time as much as possible.

A lot of college work is brain work, and you need physical exercise on a regular basis. Exercise can be solitary or done with friends, but it needs to involve both cardiovascular activity and the use of your large muscle groups. Exercise at least three times a week for an hour. Some exercise can be intense and some can be as relaxing as a semi-brisk walk with a friend.

Be smart on the use of alcohol as a drug. When utilizing alcohol, do so as a beverage to enhance a social event or a meal. The problem with alcohol used to the level of intoxication is that it not only destroys brain cells, but it takes your body too long to recuperate. It is your responsibility to make alcohol decisions sensibly. Your university counseling service has information that might help you make more responsible choices regarding this drug.

Take some time once a week to clean and reorganize your living space. When things are kept in order, people just seem to work more efficiently and more effectively. It is a disciplined activity that seems to help people manage their time and their life more effectively.

Relationships

College is a unique experience, and not all persons get to experience college. It is a period in your life where you have more choices, possibly more free time, and a wider range of activities. There is probably no period in your life where more significant changes will occur. Some of your relationships will change, and you will establish new relationships.

It is important to keep in touch with your family. College is a transition period during which you will develop new patterns for your life and evaluate the patterns that you have learned from your family. Developing new interests and life patterns, learning more about your world, and spending most of your time with your studies, may cause you to spend less time interacting with your family. You may find it helpful to find ways to ritualize your contacts with your family, such as calling at a certain time of the week or day. If you live away from your family decide on the number of visits that you will make to your home environment during each semester. If you live with your family, schedule times for family activities and for family conversations. Share your college experiences during these times and communicate any changes that are taking place in your life. Some of your family members may not accept the changes, but it is important for you to share with your family and to listen to what is changing in your family members= lives.

Set aside time to develop new and meaningful relationships in college. In college most people develop a series of acquaintances, friendships, and loving relationships. Take time to focus on these relationships, knowing that you will grow into some relationships in college and grow out of some of them. Work to make relationships a healthy and positive part of your college life. Counselors are available to help you define healthy aspects of relating and ways to improve your communication skills.

To make an appointment with a counselor come by the Student Services Office, located in Room W206 above the Bookstore or call 318.473.6545. The Student Services Office is open Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.





Manage Stress

College life can be very stressful. In addition to the course work, you probably have a number of other obligations and activities that take up your time. There are, however, a few things you can do to make life less stressful.

  • Keep daily or weekly to-do lists and plan ahead.
  • Get up early enough so you will not have to rush to get ready for the day.
  • Take a few minutes off while doing something stressful and get away mentally or physically by listening to the radio, watching television, walking, playing a game, or reading a book.
  • Schedule more time than you think you will need to complete a task.
  • Talk to a friend, to determine if that what is causing you stress is as serious as you think.
  • Work out or exercise is a good way to relieve stress.
  • Play and listen to some music that you like
  • Rent and watch a funny movie.
  • Let someone do you a favor. You do not have to do it all yourself.
  • Schedule some time for yourself, and do something you enjoy.
  • Try to keep things in perspective. For example, the sun will still rise tomorrow if you do not get your assignment done; you'll just have to remember to plan ahead better the next time. Don't beat yourself up over mistakes, but learn from them instead. This is much less stressful and much more productive.

If these suggestions do no bring you relief from your stress, go to Student Services (above the bookstore), Room W206, to see a counselor or schedule an appointment as soon as possible.



Manage Stress

College life can be very stressful. In addition to the course work, you probably have a number of other obligations and activities that take up your time. There are, however, a few things you can do to make life less stressful.

  • Keep daily or weekly to-do lists and plan ahead.
  • Get up early enough so you will not have to rush to get ready for the day.
  • Take a few minutes off while doing something stressful and get away mentally or physically by listening to the radio, watching television, walking, playing a game, or reading a book.
  • Schedule more time than you think you will need to complete a task.
  • Talk to a friend, to determine if that what is causing you stress is as serious as you think.
  • Work out or exercise is a good way to relieve stress.
  • Play and listen to some music that you like
  • Rent and watch a funny movie.
  • Let someone do you a favor. You do not have to do it all yourself.
  • Schedule some time for yourself, and do something you enjoy.
  • Try to keep things in perspective. For example, the sun will still rise tomorrow if you do not get your assignment done; you'll just have to remember to plan ahead better the next time. Don't beat yourself up over mistakes, but learn from them instead. This is much less stressful and much more productive.

If these suggestions do no bring you relief from your stress, go to Student Services (above the bookstore), Room W206, to see a counselor or schedule an appointment as soon as possible.